This online course is provided by University of Illinois through Coursera for FREE. 

Duration: January 26 to March 8, 2015

Course Objective

There is a growing global need in agricultural production for a workforce that is capable of integrating knowledge of animal health and production with an understanding of consumer preferences in the context of economic reality, business efficiency, and ethical constraint.  However, current evidence suggests that there is a growing shortage of people with the knowledge and problem-solving skills required to match the rapid advances being made in animal health, science, and food production.  The results of this shortage are wide-ranging and could lead to challenges in food security and agricultural economic competitiveness in some countries.

In this course we will explore the effect of infectious disease on sustainable animal-based food production. The content and learning outcomes of this new course will be designed to be relevant across different food production sectors (i.e., beef, dairy, poultry, and pigs). While the instructors will provide the participants with a strong scientific base for understanding the impact of infectious disease in animal-based food production, the emphasis of the material will be on practical problem-solving and will be directed towards equipping participants with a platform for developing the skills needed to contribute to sustainable food production.

This is an online course offered by Wageningen University through eDx for FREE. 

Duration: 6 weeks, starts on 26 January 2015

Course Objective

Feeding nine billion in 2050 without exhausting the planetary reserves is perhaps the greatest challenge mankind has ever faced. The principles of production ecology form the fundament to the ‘availability pillar’ of Global Food Security and with that lie at the heart of food production. They can be applied to both crops and animal production. This course on the basics of crop production will discuss why yields in some parts of the world are lagging behind and identify the agro-ecological drivers that shape the wide diversity of production systems. Furthermore, key issues relating to bridging of yield gaps and how these link to different visions of sustainability will be explored.

This online course will be of great interest to international students and educated public from different backgrounds, both professionally and culturally, to enrich their views and action perspectives related to global food security and food systems. Prof. Ken E. Giller will introduce you to crop production and underlying bio-physical principles in order to identify constraining factors in yield formation. He will explain how to assess yield gaps at the level of fields and production systems around the world, contributing to efficient resource management. Wageningen University and Research, through its unique systems-based approach to food systems, adds the phase of primary production to the broad context of global food security.

This online course is provided by Stanford University through Coursera for FREE. 

Duration: Anytime, unlimited access

Course Objective

Eating patterns that begin in childhood affect health and well-being across the lifespan. The culture of eating has changed significantly in recent decades, especially in parts of the world where processed foods dominate our dietary intake. This course examines contemporary child nutrition and the impact of the individual decisions made by each family. The health risks associated with obesity in childhood are also discussed. Participants will learn what constitutes a healthy diet for children and adults and how to prepare simple, delicious foods aimed at inspiring a lifelong celebration of easy home-cooked meals. This course will help prepare participants to be the leading health providers, teachers and parents of the present and future.The text and other material in this course may include the opinion of the specific instructor and are not statements of advice, endorsement, opinion, or information of Stanford University.

 

This online course is offered by Massachusetts Institute of Technology through MIT Open Course Ware for FREE.

Duration: This is a course archive available for download 

Course Objective

The purpose of this seminar is to provide a context for understanding the challenges of urban food provisioning from a perspective of sustainability and social inclusion in cities of the global South. The seminar will be specifically geared towards preparing students for direct participation in urban markets and food policy project intervention in Cartagena, Colombia. 

This online course is provided by Wageningen University through eDx for FREE.

Duration: 6 weeks, Q1 2015

Course Objective

Feeding nine billion in 2050 without exhausting the planetary reserves is perhaps the greatest challenge mankind has ever faced. The principles of production ecology form the fundament to the ‘availability pillar’ of Global Food Security and with that lie at the heart of food production. They can be applied to both crops and animal production. This course on the basics of crop production will discuss why yields in some parts of the world are lagging behind and identify the agro-ecological drivers that shape the wide diversity of production systems. Furthermore, key issues relating to bridging of yield gaps and how these link to different visions of sustainability will be explored.

This online course will be of great interest to international students and educated public from different backgrounds, both professionally and culturally, to enrich their views and action perspectives related to global food security and food systems. Prof. Ken E. Giller will introduce you to crop production and underlying bio-physical principles in order to identify constraining factors in yield formation. He will explain how to assess yield gaps at the level of fields and production systems around the world, contributing to efficient resource management. Wageningen University and Research, through its unique systems-based approach to food systems, adds the phase of primary production to the broad context of global food security.

This online course is provided by University of Minnesota through Coursera for FREE. 

Duration: 8 weeks, course has ended but course archive is available at Coursera

Course Objective

Hamburger or hummus? Organic or conventional? Mediterranean diet or McDonald's? What dietary choices are truly the most sustainable when we consider that what we eat affects not just our health but also the environment and the well-being of others?

This course will provide you with an overview of our world’s food system and its many impacts from the individual to the global scale. You will gain further appreciation of the complex implications of choices that are made along the food supply chain. You will be challenged to think critically about how the global food system may need to change to adapt to future economic and environmental conditions.

Our world’s population is projected to grow both in numbers and in wealth in the coming decades. Meeting future food demand, and doing so in a sustainable fashion, will require that we greatly increase the amount we produce and improve the efficiency by which it makes it to our tables. Join us as we explore today’s global food system and how we might improve its sustainability for our benefit and that of future generations.