This course is provided by University of British Columbia through eDx for FREE. 

Duration: 6 weeks, 5 May 2015

Course Objective

In this interdisciplinary course you will learn about the water-related dimensions of environmentally sustainable urbanism. The course features Vancouver, one of the world's leading cities for green design.

Each week, you’ll watch lectures plus a compelling documentary-style video featuring architects, planners, artists, engineers, and academics that have created real-world innovations which link water and sustainability in the built environment. You’ll meet the inspiring founder of the Center for Interactive Research on Sustainability (one of the greenest buildings in North America); visit North America’s largest urban wastewater-to-energy plant; learn from architects designing urban waterscapes as ‘landscape infrastructure’ along Vancouver’s revitalized waterfront; travel along one of North America’s largest revitalized urban streams, which has become a hub for community engagement; and explore the creation of a ‘watershed mind’ with an award-winning poet and artist. 

This online course is provided by Delft University of Technology through eDx for FREE. 

Duration: 8 weeks, starts on 26 August 2014

Course Objective

Water is essential for life on earth and of crucial importance for society. Also within our climate water plays a major role. The natural cycle of ocean to atmosphere, by precipitation back to earth and by rivers and aquifers to the oceans has a decisive impact on regional and global climate patterns.

The MOOC will cover six main topics:

  1. Global water cycle. In this module you will learn to explain the different processes of the global water cycle.
  2. Water systems. In this module you will learn to describe the flows of water and sand in different riverine, coastal and ocean systems.
  3. Water and climate change. In this module you will learn to identify mechanisms of climate change and you will learn to explain the interplay of climate change, sea level, clouds, rainfall and future weather.
  4. Interventions. In this module you will learn to explain why, when and which engineering interventions are needed in rivers, coast and urban environment.
  5. Water resource management. In this module you will learn to explain why water for food and water for cities are the main challenges in water management and what the possibilities and limitations of reservoirs and groundwater are to improve water availability.
  6. Challenges. In this module you will learn to explain the challenges in better understanding and adapting to the impact of climate change on water for the coming 50 years.

Every module is made by an expert, so you will learn from different professors. Although the different topics are taught by different professors the course line is clear and will be explained and connected by our anchor man. Examples in the environment will be given by Max, our reporter on location. The course consists of knowledge clips, movies, exercises, discussion and homework assignments. The course will be finished by an examination. The best students (based on results and activity in the forum discussions) will be invited to follow an online course of the MSc-track Water management of the faculty of Civil Engineering at the TU Delft. Together with the courses "Introduction to drinking water treatment" and "Introduction to the Treatment of Urban Sewage" they form the WaterXSeries, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, TU Delft.

This online course is provided by University of Manchester through Coursera for FREE. 

Duration: 6 weeks, course has ended but course archive available at Coursera

Course Objective

This first part of a two-part series of courses critically examines the consequences of current water and sanitation conditions, including over 2 million deaths annually due to water-related diseases, millions of dollars in avoidable health care expenditures, and billions of hours spent carrying water from sources outside the home. Reducing such costs associated with poor water and sanitation services is one of the major challenges for States in the low and middle income countries in the 21st century. The technologies to provide networked water and sanitation services are well-known, as are many low-cost, non-network solutions that would appear affordable to many poor households in developing countries. For decades the international community and national governments have struggled to find institutional and financial arrangements to provide these technologies to households and businesses in developing countries, with mixed success. Although progress is being made in many parts of the world, millions of households in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia still face a lifetime without the improved water and sanitation services that citizens in industrialized countries take for granted.

The second part will focus on what can be done to solve global water and sanitation problems. We will examine the main strategies that donors and national governments have tried to change status quo water and sanitation conditions, and the lessons learned from these experiences.

This online course is provided by Delft University of Technology through eDx for FREE.

Duration: 5 weeks, 28 October 2014

Course Objective

This course focuses on conventional technologies for drinking water treatment. Unit processes, involved in the treatment chain, are discussed as well as the physical, chemical and biological processes involved. The emphasis is on the effect of treatment on water quality and the dimensions of the  unit processes in the treatment chain.  After the course one should be able to recognise the process units, describe their function, and make basic calculations for a preliminary design of a drinking water treatment plant.

The course consists of 4 modules:

  1. Introduction to drinking water treatment. In this module you learn to describe the important disciplines, schemes and evaluation criteria involved in the design phase.
  2. Water quality. In this module you learn to identify the drinking water quality parameters to be improved and explain what treatment train or scheme is needed.
  3. Groundwater treatment. In this module you learn to calculate the dimensions of the groundwater treatment processes and draw groundwater treatment schemes.
  4. Surface water treatment. In this module you learn to calculate the dimensions of the surface water treatment processes and draw surface water treatment schemes.

The course consists of knowledge clips, movies, exercises, discussion and homework assignments. The course will be finished by an examination. The best students (based on results and activity in the forum discussions) will be invited to follow an online course of the MSc-track Water management of the faculty of Civil Engineering at the TU Delft.

Last year this course was given as part of Introduction to water treatment. This year we offer two separate courses: "Introduction to drinking water treatment" and "Introduction to the Treatment of Urban Sewage".

Together with the course "Introduction to Water and Climate" they form the Water XSeries Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, TU Delft.

LICENSE
The course materials of this course are Copyright Delft University of Technology and are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Netherlands License.

This online course is provided by Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne through Coursera for FREE. 

Duration: 5 weeks, course has ended but course archive available at Coursera. 

Course Objective

It is well known that water treatment at household level can lead to dramatic improvements in drinking water quality. But does Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage (HWTS) also have a global relevance? What are the potential solution methods and how do they function? Is there a standard strategy for successful HWTS-implementation or can we identify key components which make programs more likely to succeed?

In this course, you will learn about the public health impacts of unsafe drinking water and about different methods to treat water at household level. The course takes a closer look at the roles of different stakeholders, such as governments, private sector, and NGOs. How can HWTS reach the most vulnerable populations at scale? And how can the impact of HWTS be measured?

The MOOC “Introduction to Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage” will answer these questions with a series of concrete examples from Africa, Asia and Latin America.

This MOOC is a collaboration of Sandec/Eawag and EPFL. It will be conducted in English with English and French subtitles. It is the first course of the series “WASH in developing countries”.