Non-UN Courses



Related tags: Free Courses

Courses tagged with "non-un courses": 151

This online course is provided by University of Edinburgh through Coursera for FREE.

Duration: June to August 2015

Course Objective

Many issues threaten the future of ourselves and other species on the planet. The most prominent of these is dangerous global climate change; and this with the over-exploitation of our lands and seas, loss of biodiversity, and over-use of manufactured chemicals, affects the stability of the global systems upon which all life depends. For our species these (and other factors) contribute to social inequalities and impact on human well-being and economic stability. It is imperative that we develop an informed response to these challenges and that we feel empowered and enabled to take positive actions towards a sustainable future. 

In this course you will refine your own understanding of 'sustainability' in light of the range of definitions, contexts and educational approaches that we will discuss. This process will enable you to develop a personal ethic and positive response to ‘sustainability’, and help you to communicate these ideas to others. What on Earth could be more important?

Category: End poverty

This online course is provided by MIT through eDx for FREE. 

Duration: 3 February 2015

Course Objective

A course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty.

This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, and are hopeful that economists might have something useful to say about this challenge. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? What is economic life like when living under a dollar per day? Are the poor always hungry? How do we make schools work for poor citizens? How do we deal with the disease burden? Is microfinance invaluable or overrated? Without property rights, is life destined to be "nasty, brutish and short"? Should we leave economic development to the market? Should we leave economic development to non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Does foreign aid help or hinder? Where is the best place to intervene? And many others.


At the end of this course, you should have a good sense of the key questions asked by scholars interested in poverty today, and hopefully a few answers as well.

Category: End poverty

This is an online course provided by Columbia University through Coursera for FREE.

Duration: Anytime, unlimited access. 

Course Objectives

This course comprises three modules of Dr. Sachs' longer course, "The Age of Sustainable Development."

This preview course, "Introduction to Sustainable Development" will give you an understanding of the key challenges and pathways to sustainable development - that is, economic development that is also socially inclusive and environmentally sustainable.

Category: End poverty

This is an online course based on the book "POOR ECONOMICS". This course is FREE. 

Duration: Anytime, unlimited. This course has ended but course archive available at eDx.

Course Objective

Radically rethinking the way we fight poverty.

Why would a man in Morocco who doesn’t have enough to eat buy a television? Why is it so hard for children in poor areas to learn, even when they attend school? Does having lots of children actually make you poorer? Answering questions like these is critical if we want to have a chance to really make a dent against global poverty.

Based on our work and that of many others, we try to do that in our book. This website provides supporting material: informative slideshows, material for teaching the book, supporting data, and links to researcher and organization websites. Feel free to delve in and learn more.

 

Category: End poverty

This online course is provided by University of Pennsylvania  through Coursera for FREE.

Duration: 8 weeks, 15 September to 10 November 2014

Course Objective

Sustainability is defining a generation of students and young professionals and their influence is transforming things like cities, companies, and laws around the world. Sustainability is often explained as meeting “the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” In practice, this means understanding connections, including connections across time. These connections create systems that are greater than the simple sums of their parts, with consequences that are often unexpected by people paying attention to only one part of a system. This course provides an introduction to the ideas and practices that people are using to understand and change these connections in pursuing more sustainable processes, communities, environments, and organizations. 

Systems theory appears in many guises and most disciplines claim some share of the systems approach to connections and consequences. In ways that we will explore in the course, design thinking is a method for putting systems theory into practice. Designers and their way of thinking provide a significant contribution to sustainability in practice, from improving energy performance in buildings to identifying the value ecosystems services provide to human settlements. This course has several strategic partners providing us with content and with platforms for discussion. These networks will provide the course with an extensive and diverse portfolio of problems, solutions, illustrations, and challenges with which to explore the ideas presented above. We will use these very different venues as platforms for discussion and will organize student conversations and assignments using the network partners.    

Category: End poverty

This online course is provided by Columbia University through Coursera for FREE. 

Duration: 9 September to 5 December 2014

Course Objective

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of sustainable development, drawing on the most recent developments in the social, policy, and physical sciences. Sustainable development is the most urgent challenge facing humanity. The fundamental question is how the world economy can continue to develop in a way that is socially inclusive and environmentally sustainable. The course describes the complex interactions between the world economy and the Earth's physical environment. Ecological processes and constraints (climate, disease ecology, physical resources such as soils and energy sources, topography and transport conditions) significantly shape the patterns of economic development, demography, and wealth and poverty. At the same time, human activities (farming, land use, urbanization, demographic change, and energy use) change the physical environments, increasingly in dangerous ways. The course offers a broad overview of the key challenges and potential solutions to achieve sustainable development in the 21st century. 

Category: End poverty

This course is provided by University of Texas at Austin through eDx for FREE. 

Duration: 15 weeks, starts on 27 August 2014

Course Objective

Globalization is a fascinating spectacle that can be understood as global systems of competition and connectivity. These man-made systems provide transport, communication, governance, and entertainment on a global scale. International crime networks are outgrowths of the same systems. Topics include national identity, language diversity, the global labor market, popular culture, sports and climate change.

However, an increase in integration has not brought increased equality. Globalization creates winners and losers among countries and global corporations, making competition the beating heart of the globalization process.

The globalization process exemplifies connectivity. Globalization is unimaginable without the unprecedented electronic networks that project dominant cultural products into every society on earth.

Learn how to identify and analyze global systems and better understand how the world works.

Before your course starts, try the new edX Demo where you can explore the fun, interactive learning environment and virtual labs.

Category: End poverty

This course is provided by Massachusetts Institute of Technology through MIT Open Course Ware for FREE.

Duration: Anytime, unlimited access. This course has ended but course archive is available at MITOCW. 

Course Objective

15.975 U-Lab: Leading Profound Innovation for a More Sustainable World is an interactive and experiential class about leading profound innovation for pioneering a more sustainable economy and society. The class is organized around personal reflection practices, relational practices, and societal practices. It focuses on the intertwined relationship between the evolution of capitalism, multi-stakeholder innovation, and presencing.

Category: End poverty

This is an online course provided by Massachusetts Institute of Technology through MIT Open Course Ware for FREE.

Duration: Anytime, unlimited access. This course has ended but course archive is available at MITOCW. 

Course Objective

This course explores policy and planning for sustainable development. It critically examines concept of sustainability as a process of social, organizational, and political development drawing on cases from the U.S. and Europe. It also explores pathways to sustainability through debates on ecological modernization; sustainable technology development, international and intergenerational fairness, and democratic governance.

Category: End poverty

This course is provided by Massachusetts Institute of Technology through MIT Open Course Ware for FREE. 

Duration: Anytime, unlimited, the course has ended but course archive is available at MITOCW

Course Objective

This course examines alternative conceptions and theoretical underpinnings of the notion of "sustainable development." It focuses on the sustainability problems of industrial countries (i.e., aging of populations, sustainable consumption, institutional adjustments, etc.); and of developing states and economies in transition (i.e., managing growth, sustainability of production patterns, pressures of population change, etc.). It also explores the sociology of knowledge around sustainability, the economic and technological dimensions and institutional imperatives along with implications for political constitution of economic performance.

Category: End poverty

This online course is provided by University of Illionois at Urbana-Champaign through Coursera for FREE.

Duration: 8 weeks, 25 August to 19 October 2014

Course Objective

This course introduces the academic approach of Sustainability and explores how today’s human societies can endure in the face of global change, ecosystem degradation and resource limitations. The course focuses on key knowledge areas of sustainability theory and practice, including population, ecosystems, global change, energy, agriculture, water, environmental economics and policy, ethics, and cultural history.

This subject is of vital importance, seeking as it does to uncover the principles of the long-term welfare of all the peoples of the planet. As sustainability is a cross-disciplinary field of study, this foundation requires intellectual breadth: as I describe it in the class text, understanding our motivations requires the humanities, measuring the challenges of sustainability requires knowledge of the sciences (both natural and social), and building solutions requires technical insight into systems (such as provided by engineering, planning, and management).
Category: End poverty

This online course is provided by Georgetown University through eDx for FREE.

Duration: 7 weeks, starts on 7 October 2014

Course Objective

This course will examine how the spread of trade, investment, and technology across borders affects firms, workers, and communities in developed and developing countries. It investigates who gains from globalization and who is hurt or disadvantaged by globalization. The course will explore difficult questions such as:

  • How can developing countries avoid the "resource curse"?
  • What are some possible methods to deal with possible "sweatshop" abuses?
  • How can emerging market economies take advantage of supply chains from local firms into developed country markets?
  • How might globalization contribute to wage inequality in developed countries?
  • Should developed countries protect or promote manufacturing jobs?
  • Is China becoming an economic "superpower"?
  • Is the United States in economic decline?

The course concludes by allowing the participant to decide how to resolve the US budget deficit, and reform Social Security, so as to keep the United States competitive in the world economy.

Before your course starts, try the new edX Demo where you can explore the fun, interactive learning environment and virtual labs.

Category: End poverty

This online course is provided by University of Illinois through Coursera for FREE. 

Duration: January 26 to March 8, 2015

Course Objective

There is a growing global need in agricultural production for a workforce that is capable of integrating knowledge of animal health and production with an understanding of consumer preferences in the context of economic reality, business efficiency, and ethical constraint.  However, current evidence suggests that there is a growing shortage of people with the knowledge and problem-solving skills required to match the rapid advances being made in animal health, science, and food production.  The results of this shortage are wide-ranging and could lead to challenges in food security and agricultural economic competitiveness in some countries.

In this course we will explore the effect of infectious disease on sustainable animal-based food production. The content and learning outcomes of this new course will be designed to be relevant across different food production sectors (i.e., beef, dairy, poultry, and pigs). While the instructors will provide the participants with a strong scientific base for understanding the impact of infectious disease in animal-based food production, the emphasis of the material will be on practical problem-solving and will be directed towards equipping participants with a platform for developing the skills needed to contribute to sustainable food production.

Category: End hunger

This is an online course offered by Wageningen University through eDx for FREE. 

Duration: 6 weeks, starts on 26 January 2015

Course Objective

Feeding nine billion in 2050 without exhausting the planetary reserves is perhaps the greatest challenge mankind has ever faced. The principles of production ecology form the fundament to the ‘availability pillar’ of Global Food Security and with that lie at the heart of food production. They can be applied to both crops and animal production. This course on the basics of crop production will discuss why yields in some parts of the world are lagging behind and identify the agro-ecological drivers that shape the wide diversity of production systems. Furthermore, key issues relating to bridging of yield gaps and how these link to different visions of sustainability will be explored.

This online course will be of great interest to international students and educated public from different backgrounds, both professionally and culturally, to enrich their views and action perspectives related to global food security and food systems. Prof. Ken E. Giller will introduce you to crop production and underlying bio-physical principles in order to identify constraining factors in yield formation. He will explain how to assess yield gaps at the level of fields and production systems around the world, contributing to efficient resource management. Wageningen University and Research, through its unique systems-based approach to food systems, adds the phase of primary production to the broad context of global food security.

Category: End hunger

This online course is provided by Stanford University through Coursera for FREE. 

Duration: Anytime, unlimited access

Course Objective

Eating patterns that begin in childhood affect health and well-being across the lifespan. The culture of eating has changed significantly in recent decades, especially in parts of the world where processed foods dominate our dietary intake. This course examines contemporary child nutrition and the impact of the individual decisions made by each family. The health risks associated with obesity in childhood are also discussed. Participants will learn what constitutes a healthy diet for children and adults and how to prepare simple, delicious foods aimed at inspiring a lifelong celebration of easy home-cooked meals. This course will help prepare participants to be the leading health providers, teachers and parents of the present and future.The text and other material in this course may include the opinion of the specific instructor and are not statements of advice, endorsement, opinion, or information of Stanford University.

 

Category: End hunger

This online course is offered by Massachusetts Institute of Technology through MIT Open Course Ware for FREE.

Duration: This is a course archive available for download 

Course Objective

The purpose of this seminar is to provide a context for understanding the challenges of urban food provisioning from a perspective of sustainability and social inclusion in cities of the global South. The seminar will be specifically geared towards preparing students for direct participation in urban markets and food policy project intervention in Cartagena, Colombia. 

Category: End hunger

This online course is provided by Wageningen University through eDx for FREE.

Duration: 6 weeks, Q1 2015

Course Objective

Feeding nine billion in 2050 without exhausting the planetary reserves is perhaps the greatest challenge mankind has ever faced. The principles of production ecology form the fundament to the ‘availability pillar’ of Global Food Security and with that lie at the heart of food production. They can be applied to both crops and animal production. This course on the basics of crop production will discuss why yields in some parts of the world are lagging behind and identify the agro-ecological drivers that shape the wide diversity of production systems. Furthermore, key issues relating to bridging of yield gaps and how these link to different visions of sustainability will be explored.

This online course will be of great interest to international students and educated public from different backgrounds, both professionally and culturally, to enrich their views and action perspectives related to global food security and food systems. Prof. Ken E. Giller will introduce you to crop production and underlying bio-physical principles in order to identify constraining factors in yield formation. He will explain how to assess yield gaps at the level of fields and production systems around the world, contributing to efficient resource management. Wageningen University and Research, through its unique systems-based approach to food systems, adds the phase of primary production to the broad context of global food security.

Category: End hunger

This online course is provided by University of Minnesota through Coursera for FREE. 

Duration: 8 weeks, course has ended but course archive is available at Coursera

Course Objective

Hamburger or hummus? Organic or conventional? Mediterranean diet or McDonald's? What dietary choices are truly the most sustainable when we consider that what we eat affects not just our health but also the environment and the well-being of others?

This course will provide you with an overview of our world’s food system and its many impacts from the individual to the global scale. You will gain further appreciation of the complex implications of choices that are made along the food supply chain. You will be challenged to think critically about how the global food system may need to change to adapt to future economic and environmental conditions.

Our world’s population is projected to grow both in numbers and in wealth in the coming decades. Meeting future food demand, and doing so in a sustainable fashion, will require that we greatly increase the amount we produce and improve the efficiency by which it makes it to our tables. Join us as we explore today’s global food system and how we might improve its sustainability for our benefit and that of future generations.

 

Category: End hunger

This course is provided by the University of Geneva through Coursera for FREE.

Duration: Accessible anytime, unlimited access. Self-paced course. 

Course Objective

Ce cours est co-produit par l'Université de Genève (UNIGE) et l'Université Numérique Francophone des Sciences du Sport et de la Santé (UNF3S).

Il est proposé en partenariat avec :

L'Agence Universitaire de la Francophonie (AUF)

This course is provided by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill through Coursera for FREE.  

Duration: 5.5 hours, self-paced course, accessible anytime. 

Course Objective

Often called “the cornerstone” of public health, epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of diseases, health conditions, or events among populations and the application of that study to control health problems. By applying the concepts learned in this course to current public health problems and issues, students will understand the practice of epidemiology as it relates to real life and makes for a better appreciation of public health programs and policies. This course explores public health issues like cardiovascular and infectious diseases – both locally and globally – through the lens of epidemiology.